Final Piece: Drape experimentation

For the order side of my final piece, I decided to use the technique of draping instead of deconstruction, as I felt the technique of pleating and draping had a more ordered look and feel than deconstruction, and it worked better with my ideas for the chaos side of my dress. In my first example, I tried just using a few simple pleats on the shoulder, so that the creases would run down the back and the front of the garment. I liked the interest it brought to the top of the piece, and how it leads your eye down the rest of the garment. When pinning my second example I kept it simple and added a few darts in the front and the back to shape the fabric and left the arm quite long and full to balance the simplicity of the bodice. For my final example, and what I have decided to use for my final piece after some refinement, I decided to go all out on the pleats and fit as many as I could on the torso. I used a separate piece of fabric for the skirt and put a few pleats into it to create a fuller look. To make it ready to sew for my final piece I will need to make sure they are all neat and press very carefully.

Issey Miyake- Please Pleats

MONTHLY COLORS: JUNE | PLEATS PLEASE ISSEY MIYAKE | News | ISSEY MIYAKE INC.
AUTUMN WINTER 2020/21 | PLEATS PLEASE ISSEY MIYAKE | News | ISSEY MIYAKE  INC.

Miyake is highly esteemed Japanese designer, known for his ground breaking pleating techniques, using heat to create fabric with a ‘memory’ that keeps pleats in place, that can be used to create wrinkle-proof garments. Pleats Please launched in 1993 as a capsule collection of Mikaye’s unique pleated creations. I love that in his garments the intricacy and detail of the the pleats contrast with the simplicity of the garments designs, creating a really understated piece of clothing.You couldn’t get a piece of clothing that is more ordered, the precision needed to create these pleats is amazing. I tried to create a similar effect by creating as many small pleats as I could on the torso of one of my designs, but I didn’t get anywhere as near as many as Miyake’s designs.

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